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Posta Marcucci

Going mining

Monte Amiata is an extinct volcano which was sacred to the Etruscans and is to be found between Val d’Orcia and the Maremma. Its particular profile is visible from hundreds of kilometres away. It is mountain rich in history, of fascinating detail … and of mercury! The invitation is to take a trip and discover the fascinating happenings, some still of a mystery, and its mercury and minerals. All is revealed by the mines along its foothills, mines no longer operational but having been revalued and open to visit. We recommend two in particular: the Abbadia San Salvatore mine and its museum -its galleries may be visited from 15 June to 1 November and on public holiday days too (from 9.30 to 12.30, and from 15.30 to 18.30); the Cornacchino mine at Castell’Azzara which penetrates the mountain with a series of narrow corridors having a rich and mysterious fascination. ‘Going mining’ is a way to discover the lives of villages and their inhabitants, who from this metal attained their wealth and advancement, but also suffered many dramas and sacrifices. All relevant information you can find on the web pages of the Parco Nazionale Museo delle Miniere dell’Amiata.

www.parcoamiata.com

Bagno Vignoni – Abbadia San Salvatore 27 kilometres

Bagno Vignoni – Castell’Azzara 44 kilometres

Along the way

The valley of cypresses

There is not only Bolgheri. There are not only the cypresses of San Quirico d'Orcia, splendid as they are on the hill. The cypresses are dotted here, there, and everywhere and they are the very embodiment of this landscape.

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Places

Vignoni Alto

Borgo di Vignoni, standing proud above Bagno Vignoni, can be reached by taking a short walk along a dirt gravel road, a walk which will do wonders for body and mind and is a visit we highly recommend when staying at our hotel.

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Villages

Radicofani

In the small square of Radicofani, in the presence of a Roman church which is a joy for the eyes and a gift for the heart there is a commemorative plaque fixed to the wall.

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